Morning- It’s Monday!

English 20:
All I Am Hutterite Books are to be collected TODAY and TOMORROW.
I Am Hutterite Final Projects are to be posted on your WORDPRESS by Tuesday pm.
(Any people not handing in their Essays by Monday 3:30 will get a call home and tutorial will be suggested.)
We will begin watching Secondhand Lions today.

Social Studies 20:
Talk about “Leaving Auschwitz.”
What is your question for EDITORIAL piece of writing?
Continue reading… (You will have a full work period to just complete your editorial later in the week.-Wednesday. Today in Media Studies we will talk more about editorials.)
Continue reading our novel.

CHARACTERISTICS OF EDITORIAL WRITING  (by Alan Weintrut)
An editorial is an article that presents the newspaper’s/authors opinion on an issue. It reflects the majority vote of the editorial board, the governing body of the newspaper made up of editors and business managers. It is usually unsigned. Much in the same manner of a lawyer, editorial writers build on an argument and try to persuade readers to think the same way they do. Editorials are meant to influence public opinion, promote critical thinking, and sometimes cause people to take action on an issue. In essence, an editorial is an opinionated news story.

Editorials have:
1. Introduction, body and conclusion like other news stories
2. An objective explanation of the issue, especially complex issues
3. A timely news angle
4. Opinions from the opposing viewpoint that refute directly the same issues the writer addresses
5. The opinions of the writer delivered in a professional manner. Good editorials engage issues, not personalities and refrain from name-calling or other petty tactics of persuasion.
6. Alternative solutions to the problem or issue being criticized. Anyone can gripe about a problem, but a good editorial should take a pro-active approach to making the situation better by using constructive criticism and giving solutions.
7. A solid and concise conclusion that powerfully summarizes the writer’s opinion. Give it some punch.

Four Types of Editorials Will:
1. Explain or interpret: Editors often use these editorials to explain the way the newspaper covered a sensitive or controversial subject. School newspapers may explain new school rules or a particular student-body effort like a food drive.
2. Criticize: These editorials constructively criticize actions, decisions or situations while providing solutions to the problem identified. Immediate purpose is to get readers to see the problem, not the solution.
3. Persuade: Editorials of persuasion aim to immediately see the solution, not the problem. From the first paragraph, readers will be encouraged to take a specific, positive action. Political endorsements are good examples of editorials of persuasion.
4. Praise: These editorials commend people and organizations for something done well. They are not as common as the other three.

Writing an Editorial
1. Pick a significant topic that has a current news angle and would interest readers.
2. Collect information and facts; include objective reporting; do research
3. State your opinion briefly in the fashion of a thesis statement
4. Explain the issue objectively as a reporter would and tell why this situation is important
5. Give opposing viewpoint first with its quotations and facts
6. Refute (reject) the other side and develop your case using facts, details, figures, quotations. Pick apart the other side’s logic.
7. Concede a point of the opposition — they must have some good points you can acknowledge that would make you look rational.
8. Repeat key phrases to reinforce an idea into the reader’s minds.
9. Give a realistic solution(s) to the problem that goes beyond common knowledge. Encourage critical thinking and pro-active reaction.
10. Wrap it up in a concluding punch that restates your opening remark (thesis statement).
11. Keep it to 500 words; make every work count; never use “I”

Media Studies 20:
How are your charts coming?
How is your Photo of a Day coming?

3.4a Examing Editorials
Examine an editorial page from two large dailies and two weeklies.

  1. What are the typical elements of an editorial page?
  2. How does it differ from the front page?
  3. What is the opinion expressed in each editorial?
  4. Who stands to benefit from the opinion expressed?
  5. Who stands to lose?
  6. What facts does the editorial writer use to support the opinion?
  7. How does the writer attempt to persuade readers?
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